Steve Reich (The starter of Looped&Sampled based musics)-He says he didn't learn much from Beethoven

Discussion in 'Education' started by foster911, Dec 8, 2016.

  1. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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  3. timer

    timer Kapellmeister

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    Beethoven didn't learn much from Reich, either.
     
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  4. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    There are lots of points in the title's sentence that must be profoundly meditated. BTW, he's not a normal guy. He changed the way we produce and interpret the music.
     
  5. Talmi

    Talmi Rock Star

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    Thank you for the video @foster911
    I saw a free event of him,in my area in Paris last summer, it was very nice.
    Also there is a kadenze class (loop repetition and variation in music, cheers @ArticStorm !) which was on the sister site (i don't know if it's still the case) where they go about his phasing drum technique and how to apply it in ableton. It's pretty cool.
     
  6. Soul1975

    Soul1975 Kapellmeister

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    The starter of Looped&Sampled based music
    :rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
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  7. superliquidsunshine

    superliquidsunshine Audiosexual

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    The title misinforms and is a wee out of context concerning his "musical education". He feels more an affinity for pre 1750 composers and is not slurring a master of whom he recognizes brilliance, just one he does not nod to, One needs to listen and learn, and learn indeed. Thanks for the cool link, Pink.
     
  8. seriousofficial

    seriousofficial Ultrasonic

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    spot on! the title is not very on the spot and moreso suggests a confirmation bias of any kind.
     
  9. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    Be sure you were not misinformed. He just used the bare and fundamental concepts of tonality that had been formed majorly in the medieval, renascence and baroque periods such as polyphony, chords and etc.

    By saying not learning much from Beethoven, he tries to say that he did not use the complicated musical forms and orchestration (choosing of sounds) had been noticeably flourished in the classic and romantic eras by Mozart, Beethoven and others because he was attempting to yield a new way of composition by using sampled sounds that there was no precedent before him and his friends.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2016
  10. westfinch

    westfinch Kapellmeister

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    Les Paul started using loops in the 1950s. The Beatles and George Martin were using loops and samples in the mid 1960s. Where was this genius? Inventing the internet with Al Gore? :)
     
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  11. superliquidsunshine

    superliquidsunshine Audiosexual

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    I didn't hear him speak anywhere of sounds but only on structure. Could you either quote him or leave a timestamp for your reference to the kinds of sampled sounds of which you speak?

    I then listened again, can't find it. Great interview though.
     
  12. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    Stephen Michael "Steve" Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer who, along with La Monte Young, Terry Riley, and Philip Glass, pioneered minimal music in the mid to late 1960s.

    Reich's style of composition influenced many composers and groups. His innovations include using tape loops to create phasing patterns (for example, his early compositions It's Gonna Rain and Come Out), and the use of simple, audible processes to explore musical concepts (for instance, Pendulum Music and Four Organs). These compositions, marked by their use of repetitive figures, slow harmonic rhythm and canons, have significantly influenced contemporary music, especially in the US. Reich's work took on a darker character in the 1980s with the introduction of historical themes as well as themes from his Jewish heritage, notably the Grammy Award-winning Different Trains.

    Writing in The Guardian, music critic Andrew Clements suggested that Reich is one of "a handful of living composers who can legitimately claim to have altered the direction of musical history". The American composer and critic Kyle Gann has claimed that Reich "may...be considered, by general acclamation, America's greatest living composer".
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Reich
     
  13. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    One of my previous posts, bring it here again about minimalism:

    ( Y2K: It's Not as Bad as They Thought It Would Be)

    The end of the millennium brought about a changing world of music, with globalization playing a key role in the expansion and development of other types of music as art music. The term art music itself broadened, encompassing not only the work of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven, but also music from the jazz repertoire, rock and roll, and musical theatre. One indication of this is the role of these types of music in education, with all of them serving as areas of scholarly research and publishing. Globalization has also expanded the appetite of listeners, with many now becoming aware of and interested in East Asian music.

    One of the most popular trends in what we will continue to call classical music has been minimalism, a compositional technique in which musical materials (i.e. pitches, rhythms, etc.) are kept to a minimum and simplified so that music itself is transparent and obvious. Minimalism can also be seen in the visual arts, as well as in the culinary art of gastronomy, where complex dishes are reduced down to their most basic components. Three American composers have contributed the most to bring minimalism to a broad artist: Steve Reich (b. 1936), Philip Glass (b. 1937) and John Adams (b. 1947). They all have enjoyed success in their own right: Reich with his own music ensembles, Glass primarily in film music, and Adams almost exclusively in the classical vein.

    Towards the end of the twentieth century, composers were faced with the reality that in order to obtain performances for their works, they must find a way to make it more accessible for audiences. While it was relatively easy for a composer to receive a commission for the premiere of a new work, securing subsequent performances was a difficult feat. At the same time, audiences for classical music seemed to be dwindling, with long-standing orchestras even shutting their doors due to budgetary shortfalls. Minimalism was one solution to the accessibility dilemma, while for others the answer was polystylism (a combination of old and new styles through direct quotation or stylistic allusion), neo- Romanticism (an adoption of the expressive toolbox from the Romantic period), and the invocation of extra musical imagery and meanings.

    It is too early to say what music of the last seventy-five years will be remembered by music history, which pieces will enter the permanent repertoire of classical music. While there does not appear to be a leading figure in this time period, it just might be good thing for music. With advances in technology encouraging the constant creation and dissemination of new music, it is no longer necessary to focus our listening on just a few great composers.
     
  14. mild pump milk

    mild pump milk Russian Milk Drunkard

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    Why this thread is in Education forum, not in Humor?
    By the way, how loops and samples connected with Beethoven? I didn't learn so much from Bach and Chopin how to make trance leads, wobble basses, and trap snares. I didn't learn so much from Mozart how to do mastering, and Shubert still didn't teach me to mix hip hop.
     
  15. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    Not related to this thread because it's post minimal (exploited orchestra with lots of repetitions) by John Adams:
     
  16. timer

    timer Kapellmeister

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    One should not misread that quote. It's about the phasing, not the tape loops.

    Drum loops were present in the Chamberlin Rhythmate already, tape loops were used in musique concrète before, and afair there have been electromechanical instruments playing a kind of loops around 1930 already. Days of my youth... :guru:
    Not to forget fairground organs and other music machines much earlier, though they have not been loop based in a strict sense.

    There are quite a few loop oriented musical traditions in the world actually. Steve Reich basically picked them up and added the phasing part.
    (Phasing again has been present in American music since the 1910s with https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._4_(Ives) )

    Btw.: It's a misconception, I believe, that every aspect of music got more complex after 1750 (rather 1730 imho). The melodic and some of the rhythmical aspects were severely simplified during the transition from polyphony to classicism.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2016
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  17. superliquidsunshine

    superliquidsunshine Audiosexual

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    My total agreement with Andrew Clements in regard to Reich as being "America's greatest living composer" and every fact fact that you cite still only informs me of his, Reich's splendid experiments in regard to structure. Process relates to structure, not to manipulation and/or experimentation of sound. Sound is the outcome, the sum of his toying with mathematic inventions throughout the centuries, and not the prime focus of his series of moments. So still and once again, "Could you either quote him or leave a timestamp for your reference to the kinds of sampled sounds of which you speak"? Other than that, your's is an opinion, which is fine, dandy and wonderful, but you seem to be putting words in the mouth of a master to suite your personal thesis. That lies at the root of my persistence.
     
  18. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    Wow! Who are you sir?:woot:
    Please accept my gratitude from Audiosex community.:bow:
    Sorry, please watch this video instead of the first one::winker:



    The work is in two parts of roughly equal length, the first using the "It's Gonna Rain" sample, the second using a separate section of the speech with short phrases cut together and the resultant pattern then phased as in the first part, but with additional tape delay to create a more processed sound.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2016
  19. foster911

    foster911 Rock Star

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    You're comparing the simple musics (devised to be understood by the masses) and toying with them :dj: with the Art music?
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2016
  20. phloopy

    phloopy Rock Star

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    Steve Reich was one of many musicains/composers that started working with loops and stuff in the 60ties!!

    Infact this composer started already in the 50ties:






    Else Marie Pade (2 December 1924 – 18 January 2016) was a Danish composer. She was educated as a pianist at the Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen. She studied composition first with Vagn Holmboe, and later with Jan Maegaard, from whom she learned twelve-tone technique. In 1954, she became the first Danish composer of electronic and concrete music (Bruland 2001). She worked with Pierre Schaeffer and Karlheinz Stockhausen, as well as Pierre Boulez.
     
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  21. superliquidsunshine

    superliquidsunshine Audiosexual

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    There you go!
     
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