Is it possible to carefully tune a drum sample with EQ? How to get colorful lowend?

Discussion in 'Mixing and Mastering' started by MaXe1, Nov 25, 2019.

  1. MaXe1

    MaXe1 Ultrasonic

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    Is it possible to carefully tune a drum sample with EQ?
    Well I know you will select the fundamental, scoop it out or boost it but that does not affect the harmonics. I hear these pro producers, their drum hits are coherent frequency wise. Although the harmonic content is totally different their samples are in key in a surprising way.
    You might offer me to layer drums with a clean synth at low end. But it just does not sound like authentic drum. These producers have colorful low end hits. I wonder how one should go after these different cool low end sounds (harmonically wise - I mean harmonic content wise)
    One synth(Probably sine wave or whatever) gives you a clean low end but does not give you a sweet low-end. By colorful low end I mean harmonic variety in low end rather than one wack 808 which we have boosted higher harmonics(Which still sounds wack anyways)
    You want example? Just look at your favorite producers. For instance musics produced by Aftermath producers... Most of them are just colorful and I am sure that not all of the stuff have been played live. Low end is colorful in an unexpected way. In addition, drum samples are tuned in a crazy way (both low end and high end)
    Just give me some tips aside layering. Cause when you layer sounds and you don't have the appropriate high end that matches the whole harmonic content, it just sounds wack( Even with balancing and etc)
    I know my question might sound broad and pointless in some way but you know I ask it anyways :)
     
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  3. Baxter

    Baxter Audiosexual

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    You can't really tune a drum with EQ, as the harmonic ratio is then fixated. You can shape it.
    You tune it by pitching/transposing it. Or frequency shift it (not the same as pitching, as the ratio will change).

    Also, layering, saturation, filtering/EQ, parallel processing will get you far.

    Maybe you are just doing it wrong. If you let all sounds have its place in both the X (time: transient, omph, body, tail, reverb/room) and Y (frequencies: avoiding overlapping/masking) you might get the result that you want. It's also about context and how the composition is. If there is more room, you get to do more things with each element.
    Please post an example so we can hear what you are referring to.
     
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